Run To Meet The Giant

A couple of months ago I wrote a blog entitledFacing The Giantin which I recounted the story of David and Goliath. In re-reading that story earlier today, I noticed something I had not noticed the first time.

As the Philistine moved closer to attack him, David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet him. 1 Samuel 17:48 (NIV)


Wait a minute. David not only faces the Goliath, he runs to meet him. Is this an important detail and if so, how does this pertain to us today?

The Bible tells us that whenever Goliath appeared, the Israelite soldiers fled in terror (1 Samuel 17:24) and who could blame them? Goliath was a formidable enemy. He was taller and stronger than any other man amongst them and the very idea of facing him struck terror into their hearts.

David on the other hand does not only face his enemy; he runs toward him. In other words, David is on the offense. He turns the table and instead of Goliath coming after David, he is going after Goliath. Wow!

Do we let the enemy come to us or do we go after him? We may be patting ourselves on the back for standing firm and yes, standing firm is a good thing but are we on the offensive, boldly running toward the enemy and meeting him head on? Are we running to meet the giant?

Scripture quotation taken from theHoly Bible, New International Version, NIV Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 byBiblica, Inc.Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Photo bychrisdebruynonFoter.com/CC BY-NC-SA

 K Reynolds
I have been a member of ChristianBlog.Com for 10 years, 11 months and 17 days.
I have published 2,381 blogs and 7,062 comments.
John Knox (@watchmanjohn)

This idea of running towards the enemy is a wonderful revelation that dovetails in with my same thoughts; for so often we pretend to be brave but our actions do not show such bravery as we fail to engage the enemy in boldness and God given authority 'head-on.'

Steve Hurt (@steveh)

You have made a great insightful point.
If I may from personal experience show David also "ran from" to "run to".

In the mist of were he stood was doubt and redicule - unbelief. Chose to ignore these voices and "run from" these temptations to "running to" insurmountable odds defending Isreal and the Name of his God.

Perhaps one of the moments Paul is thinking of in the statement telling Timothy to "run from".
I've enjoyed your thoughts on this and related post.