When No Is The Answer

Most of the time, we do not like the word, "no". There are exceptions to this of course. If you ask someone, "Are you in pain?" and they say, "No." that's a good thing but generally speaking we do not like the word no and we like it even less when it is said to us. This isn't surprising. In the Garden, Adam and Eve disobeyed God and humanity has struggled with the word no ever since.

When a child takes their request to their father, they are hopeful that his answer will be yes. In fact, sometimes they are absolutely certain of his reply. Sometimes they are right but sometimes they are wrong and the answer is no. It hurts when the answer is no. Doesn't our father love us anymore? Doesn't he care about us? He could give/do what we ask so why doesn't he simply say yes? Bewildered and hurt we often demand an explanation and while sometimes the father gives us one, sometimes he doesn't. We simply must accept that he loves us and we must trust him.

This is even more true of our Heavenly Father. We need, we want, we hope but sometimes the answer is no. We don't get what we have asked for, not now at least or not in the manner we had hoped. We cry out to God but sometimes we are so hurt and bewildered that we cannot even cry out and God is silent. Why?

I cannot be certain but I know that as a parent and a teacher of young children sometimes I had to be still and let a child cry. It was useless to talk to them at the moment. They were so hurt, so angry, so disappointed that they would not hear my words and sometimes they might even shrug off my hugs. They needed to curl up and cry for awhile and so I would stand off to one side and allow them to do so. I was always there but they were not always aware of my presence. I would carefully watch them and when the moment was right, then and only then would they feel my presence and be in a position where they could hear my voice, receive my embrace and receive my love.

Perhaps the same is true with us. God needs to step back and let us cry. We don't feel His presence or hear His voice but we must step out in faith that He is still in the room and has not abandoned us. He knows what we need, when we need it and we must trust that He is there, even when we are crying in a dark and lonely corner of the room.

Beth M @blest ·

Wow. Yup, maybe that's it.

Barbra Lambert @enje25 ·

"I cannot be certain but I know that as a parent and a teacher of young children sometimes I had to be still and let a child cry. It was useless to talk to them at the moment. They were so hurt, so angry, so disappointed that they would not hear my words and sometimes they might even shrug off my hugs. They needed to curl up and cry for awhile and so I would stand off to one side and allow them to do so. I was always there but they were not always aware of my presence. I would carefully watch them and when the moment was right, then and only then would they feel my presence and be in a position where they could hear my voice, receive my embrace and receive my love."

This is just a wonderful analogy,K!

It really opens up an understanding of how His presence is with us all the time and when our hurts, angers, and disappointments have done all for us they can do (because we are human) - each of these emotional responses truly do have their place in helping us release emotional pain... "until"... we're ready for the next level of growth in Him. Something that can't be rushed!

Excellent, just excellent!

Steve Hurt @serveonlyhim ·

I agree with enje great.

Couldn't help but think of a few stubborn Prophets/people God had to deal with this way in the OT.

K Reynolds @kreynolds ·

I woke up this morning thinking about the day my dad died as well as this blog. The day my dad died was my first real encounter with God saying, "No." For 20 years my mother had prayed for my dad's salvation and from the time I was a small child, I had as well. Our prayer was answered on September 26, 1977. I was 16 years old and my father had just turned 43. He had been battling colon cancer for nearly two years and had been hospitalized a few weeks early.

They were supposed to do an emergency operation on him at 7:00 a.m. but they didn't come. There was some sort of delay and we couldn't figure out what was going on. When he came to Christ shortly before 11:00 a.m., we knew why. They came for him a few minutes later.

He was getting better. I remember feeling so very hopeful. I was certain that my dad was not only going to get better, God was going to heal him, he would come home and best of all, he was now a Christian. Oh, that was so evident in his life, even from a hospital bed. He fairly radiated the love of God and no one could enter his room without hearing what Jesus Christ had done in his life and could do in theirs as well. Truly he was a new creation!

I was so optimistic! My dad would be coming home soon. On Wednesday, October 13th, I stopped in after school to see my dad. He had been taken downstairs for some tests so I waited. When he came back he was acting strange and I remember the nurse telling me it was due to some meds they had just given him for pain. She was wrong.

My father had been undergoing radiation treatments just prior to the time he'd had the emergency surgery. They hadn't wanted to do it and in fact had delayed it as long as possible hoping that his body had recovered enough to heal. It hadn't and he passed away on October 17, 1977.

How I raged at God that morning when I had awakened. Interestingly enough, I knew the moment I had awakened. No one had to tell me. This wasn't fair, it wasn't right!

Les Braswell @doneuntotheleast ·

Keep having to "relearn" how much better and greater God knows my needs than I. Though disappointed and upset seeing down the road He REALLY does know what is best.